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A Look Back at Vancouver’s Most Popular Nightclubs: Luv-A-Fair

luv-a-fair vancouver

Photo: LUV-A-FAIR -- The Official Nightclub and Event Page / Facebook

bPeople who visited Luv-A-Fair still remember it with such fond emotions it’s like you had to be there. 

Luv-A-Fair lasted 30 years on Seymour St. before Yaletown became gentrified.

RELATED: A Look Back at Vancouver’s Most Popular Nightclubs: Richard’s on Richards

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Photo: — LUV-A-FAIR — The Official Nightclub and Event Page / Facebook

Luv-a-Fair

In 1975 it originally opened as a gay disco but by the end of the 70s, the club owners drastically changed concepts and Luv-A-Fair became an alternative music club.

The DJs played predominantly alternative rock music, post-punk and new wave, like the Clash, the Cramps, Iggy Pop, Nina Hagen, the Cure and Vancouver’s Skinny Puppy. 

It was a regular hang out for Vancouver’s alternative scene, with some of the regulars shying away from the weekends, when out of towners would come. 

There were bars in Vancouver that hosted live acts of the Top 40 variety, but Luv-A-Fair was the only club that didn’t play Top 40.

The DJ weren’t hyped either. Instead of playing on a raised platform, they played behind a sheet of one way glass above the dance floor.

Clubbers recall Luv-A-Fair as a safe place to dance free of judgment and many were at a loss when it closed in 2003.

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Photo: — LUV-A-FAIR — The Official Nightclub and Event Page / Facebook

The club owners went on to start Caprice nightclub on Granville St. and in the years that followed almost all traces of Vancouver’s alternative scene have been wiped from downtown. Caprice itself shut down operations after 15 years.

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