Greyhound Pulling Out Of 61 BC Communities Will Impact 2 Million Passengers

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Greyhound

This fall, national coach transportation supplier, Greyhound, will cut service to all of Western Canada.

Citing a steady decline in ridership since 2010, the company made the decision to downsize operations to Eastern Canada. Indeed, ridership has decreased an astonishing 41% since that time, even with a rising national population.

The decision will affect nearly 2 million passengers in 61 BC communities. Further, 415 will lose their jobs.

As of October 31st at 11:59 PM, operations will officially discontinue in all provinces except Ontario and Quebec. With that being said, the transportation provider stated that they will continue service between Seattle and Vancouver. This route is operated by Greyhound Lines, Inc. (USA) and BoltBus.

Of course, the decline in ridership is primarily due to declining ridership in rural communities; however, increased competition from subsidized national as well as inter-regional passenger transportation services were also impeding factors.

It is with a heavy heart that we announce these service impacts for the end of October. We understand that these route changes are difficult for our customers. Simply put, we can no longer operate unsustainable routes,” stated Stuart Kendrick, Senior Vice President of Greyhound Canada.

“We are committed to keeping customers informed and will continue to provide fair and open communications to ensure that adequate notice is given.”

Greyhound Discontinues Service

The following BC routes will be discontinued:

  • Calgary – Kelowna – Kamloops – Vancouver
  • Vancouver – Whistler – Pemberton
  • Prince George – Kamloops
  • Osoyoos – Penticton – Kelowna – Kamloops

In August of 2017, the company cut service to four routes in Northern BC and one on Vancouver Island. Moreover, the company stated similar reasons for cutting the routes.  Specifically, that the number of passengers traveling on these routes dropped a staggering 51 per cent and the population in rural communities continues to drop.

Consequently, the company discussed changing the amount of service to ten additional routes throughout the province. Some of these routes included Vancouver to Pemberton, Kelowna, Osoyoos, Prince George and the Alberta boundary.

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